Read This!

The weather is turning cooler, with the days getting shorter. Before you know it, the temperate fall weather we’ve enjoyed will give way to the blistering cold of winter. If you ask us, this is the time to get a hot beverage, a Snuggie and a good marketing book.

 

Sounds boring, you say? You’d rather watch a Power Point presentation on finance or read a legal document? Well, boo. You just aren’t reading the right marketing books.

 

Surely you need not be reminded of the importance of continued education. It keeps the brain breathing healthy, gives you an edge on the job, and expands your perspective. But you don’t need to go to school to continue learning; you simple need to visit your local bookstore.

 

Knowing that marketing may not be your bag, we selected three books worth reading that will appeal to laypeople. These are not white papers or text books, though they are very informative. All three books are accessibly written, and dare we say sometimes entertaining. But each will improve your understanding of key areas of marketing. When you put the book down, you’ll be left with actionable insights.

 

Guerilla Marketing for Non-Profits

By Jay Conrad Levinson

Entrepreneur Press

 

While most definitions of “guerilla,” including Webster’s, talk about independent groups engaging warfare through “sabotage and harassment,” you should not sabotage or harass your audience with marketing, and the book does not suggest this. Instead, it shows how non-profits with limited resources can find creative paths to effective marketing. These ideas can easily be applied to small businesses as well. Nearly all areas of marketing are covered here. We especially like the chapter “How to Turn Your Mission Statement Into a Marketing Tool,” but we also appreciate chapters on social media, relationship cultivation and fundraising success.

 

Full Frontal PR: Building Buzz About Your Business, Your Product, or You

Richard Laermer

Bloomberg Press

 

In the PR world, Richard Laermer is a rock star, and this is his manifesto. It was a best seller when it came out, and for good reason. Laermer is an excellent writer that conveys principles of publicity with compelling examples. Though it is a few years old, Laermer is such a strong trend predictor that it still reads more current than similar books, even when talking about online buzz building. Laermer knows media – TV, radio, print, etc. – and when you are done reading you will, too. The writing is so up-beat and fun that you’ll hardly notice how dense it is with tips, tricks and insights into getting attention.

 

The Corporate Creative: Rips and Tactics for Thriving as an In-house Designer

By And Epstein

How

 

Yes, this is written for graphic designers, and perhaps you aren’t a graphic designer. No fear! There are valuable insights for all in this little volume. For creative types, it can be difficult to be effective, productive and successful in a corporate environment, which means any business with a tight structure. That person on your staff that you turn to for ideas, the one with the overly decorated or messy office, this book is a great gift for them. The author is a graphic designer, but the top and tips can be cross-discipline.

 

By now you must be wondering: Why would A-Train recommend these books that empower me to do on my own what they do as a service? Well, we care about you is the quick answer. But more, we know that working with clients that have an understanding of why we recommend the strategies and creative ideas we do will ensure effective implementation. These books are packed with ideas, but they do not substitute the years of experience at A-Train.